Film History, Movies, Reviews, Tribute

Bloodstone: When Rajini went to Hollywood


It’s that time of the year again. Rajinikanth, or Thalaivar (The Leader) as his worshipers affectionately call him, has set screens ablaze all across the world with his latest tour de force, Enthiran/Robot. Facebook, twitter et al are bursting with reviews, anecdotes, videos, articles about the star. Slate, the world renowned online magazine devoted to the arts, posted an article on him, which introduces him thus:

Jackie Chan is the highest-paid actor in Asia…The second-highest-paid actor in Asia is a balding, middle-aged man with a paunch, hailing from the Indian state of Tamil Nadu and sporting the kind of moustache that went out of style in 1986. This is Rajinikanth, and he is no mere actor—he is a force of nature. If a tiger had sex with a tornado and then their tiger-nado baby got married to an earthquake, their offspring would be Rajinikanth.

That’s Rajini for you; you can love him, adore him, dismiss him or laugh at him, but you can NOT ignore him. He’s literally, and I mean literally, worshiped by those hailing from South India, particularly the state of Tamil Nadu – but his fan following is spread all across the world – from Japan and Korea to the US and UK.

And he enjoyed the same adulation and praise in the 80s, so much so that a certain Ashok Amritraj (brother of ace Tennis player Vijay Amritraj), decided to co-produce a Hollywood adventure spectacle a la Indiana Jones films or Romancing the Stone, set in India, starring Rajinikanth. Thus was born Bloodstone. It was written by B-Movie Mogul Nico Mastorakis, and directed by Dwight Little (known for films like Halloween 4, Rapid Fire, and Murder at 1600).

Bloodstone is Hollywood B-Movie in all its glory. It is about a mythical Indian stone – a ruby, looted by the British in colonial times, which is smuggled back to India by a cold blooded Dutch collector named Ludwig Van Hoeven, who’ll go to any extent to get his hands on it. An American tourist couple (played by Brett Stimley and Anna Nicholas), unwittingly become a party to the crime, and the wife is kidnapped by Van Hoeven. To the rescue comes Shyam Sabu, the most colorful and talented cabbie in the whole wide world, who can drive an Ambassador and a knife with equal panache – played by who else – Rajinikanth!

The film is a delightful action-adventure romp, the kind that you laugh off but enjoy all the same. Full of all the stereotypical imagery and iconography that India invokes in the western psyche – Maharajahs, Princesses, gold and riches, cursed diamonds, snakes, tigers and elephants, the most persistently annoying and irritating factor of the film is a buffoon named Inspector Ramesh. Lord Almighty knows (does he?) why the makers chose to let an American (Charlie Brill) essay the role – the fake accent and mannerisms get extremely tiresome for the poor viewer. But whatever misgivings you might have with such a film, is compensated many times over by Rajinikanth’s awesome presence. Even with the cute accent (“Money, money, money – that’s all people talk about – whatever happened to lau?“), he exudes the charm and charisma that he’s known for. Even the Rajini Antics like throwing the knife from one hand to the other back and forth, lighting the cigarette in style…they’re all there. He even throws in a dance move, even if for a split second…

There he goes..

Must-watch, all Rajini fans out there!

Film History, Movies, Tribute

The Best Hollywood-Bollywood Remakes (Copies) Ever


Have been unable to post much in the past weeks. Life has been throwing some nasty surprises. Anyways, let’s get down to business. Today’s list will cover Bollywood remakes/ (ahem) adaptations of Hollywood movies. Our filmmakers have always been inspired by Hollywood. Right from Raj Kapoor’s Chori Chori (1956) which had ‘elements of’ Frank Capra’s Clark Gable starrer It happened One Night (1934), to the more recent Kareena-Shahid Kapoor debacle Milenge Milenge (2010) which was a shoddy copy of John Cusack-Kate Beckinsale blockbuster Serendipity (2001).

Here goes:

1. The Godfather Inspirations:

Dharmatma (1975) Dir. Feroze Khan, Starring Feroze Khan (Michael Corleone), Prem Nath (Vito “The Godfather” Corleone) , Hema Malini & Rekha

Zulm Ki Hukumat (1992) Dir. Bharat Rangachary, Starring Dharmendra, Govinda, Shakti Kapoor, Paresh Rawal & Kimi Katkar

Aatank Hi Aatank (1995) Dir. Dilip Shankar, Starring Aamir Khan, Rajinikanth (Sonny Corleone), Juhi Chawla, Pooja Bedi

Aamir Khan and Rajinikanth in Aatank hi Aatank

2. James Bond Fan Club:

Golden Eyes Secret Agent 077 (1968) Dir. Kamal Sharma, Starring Sailesh Kumar, Mumtaz, Helen

Sailesh Kumar as Agent 077 in Golden Eyes Secret Agent 077

Aankhen (1968) Dir. Ramanand Sagar, Starring Dharmendra, Mala Sinha, Mehmood

Dharmendra as Agent Sunil in Aankhen

Inspector (1970) Dir. Chand, Starring Joy Mukherjee, Helen, Rajendra Nath

Joy Mukherjee as Agent 707 in "Inspector"

Agent Vinod (1977) Dir. Deepak Bahry, Starring Mahendra Sandhu, Asha Sachdev, K.N. Singh

Surakksha (1979) Dir. Ravikant Nagaich, Starring Mithun Chakraborty, Ranjeeta, Jeevan

Mithun as Agent Gopi/ Gunmaster G-9 in Surakksha

Wardaat (1981) Dir. Ravikant Nagaich, Starring Mithun Chakraborty, Kaajal Kiran, Shakti Kapoor, Kalpana Iyer

Bond 303 (1985) Dir. Ravi Tandon, Starring Jeetendra, Parveen Babi

Mr. Bond (1992) Dir. Raj N. Sippy, Starring Akshay Kumar, Sheeba, Pankaj Dheer

And, finally…this one’s more of a Jason Bourne clone:

Prince (2010) Dir. Kookie V Gulati, Starring Vivek Oberoi, Nandana Sen, Neeru Bajwa & Aruna Shields

…..to be continued